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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Today's Writing Prompt: 9/11

Write about your memories of 9/11/01.

If you respond to this prompt on your blog or website, be sure to visit the Weekly Mister Linky so others can easily click on your link!

One-Minute Writing of the Day:
Writer: Staci 

On 9-11 I felt two emotions. I felt helpless. Helpless because the highway exits where I lived were blocked off by police officers. If anything happened on the Island, we were sitting ducks with no way out. I felt helpless for the children at my new job who had relatives working in the Pentagon and in New York City who were scared for their kin. I felt helpless when a bomb threat was called into our school. I especially felt helpless for my first grade students.
I felt hopeful when I saw the first responders spring into action. I felt hopeful when ordinary citizens helped each other and offered comfort. I felt hopeful when I saw so many American flags. I felt hopeful when my 7-year-old son told me that the events of the day were scary but made him more determined to become a firefighter. I felt hopeful when first graders wrote the book, September 12th We Knew Everything Would Be Alright.

Congratulations on another win, Staci! I think your feelings of hopefulness combined with hopelessness were shared by many. 

8 comments:

June Calender said...

A mile and a half away, in a tiny cell of an office, a computer screen and set of earphones insulated me from all that was happening in lower Manhattan. Only a later did a coworker in the brownstone converted to offices think to come upstairs and find me to tell me what was happening. Later we ate lunch at a nearby sidewalk cafe--crowded with people like ourselves, barely talking. After that I walked three miles north, through empty Times Square and nearly empty streets. The city was deathly quiet except for distant sirens of occasional ambulances headed for hospitals. ... a tiny bit of my memories of the event.

Ron. said...

Everyone wants everyone else to remember 9/11. I prefer to remember it quietly, not endlessly relive it in all its tragic detail. I'll be happy when we get back to being in the present.

Staci said...

On 9-11 I felt two emotions. I felt helpless. Helpless because the highway exits where I lived were blocked off by police officers. If anything happened on the Island, we were sitting ducks with no way out. I felt helpless for the children at my new job who had relatives working in the Pentagon and in New York City who were scared for their kin. I felt helpless when a bomb threat was called into our school. I especially felt helpless for my first grade students.
I felt hopeful when I saw the first responders spring into action. I felt hopeful when ordinary citizens helped each other and offered comfort. I felt hopeful when I saw so many American flags. I felt hopeful when my 7-year-old son told me that the events of the day were scary but made him more determined to become a firefighter. I felt hopeful when first graders wrote the book, September 12th We Knew Everything Would Be Alright.

God Bless America.

Curly-T said...

I remember leaving history class, coming into Smith Lobby, looking for my crush, and instead, seeing that second tower get hit.
10 years later I'm not honestly sure if the picture in my memory is the one I initially saw, or the one that was played over and over, printed on every paper and magazine.... All I know is, it definitely made me change how I looked at history and what my roll in that history (the sharing of it, the partaking of it, the remember it) is.

Jeff D'Antonio said...

It's a repost, but here's mine:

10 Years ago...

Michelle @ The True Book Addict said...

Mine is in the linky. My post is on my main blog today, instead of my writing blog.

Divenita said...

Was in class 9 and the power went off. We switched on the radio and we heard this sad news.
WE prayed for all.
That's the only memory i have of 9/11 from Hyderabad, India.

rigne said...

freshman year.1st semester. end of PE class. , the student body stood and sat, shocked, some were shaking their heads, some were confused, as reports on the 9/11 attack was broadcast at the large TV placed near the school's basketball court.
we saw videos of people jumping to their deaths as the twin towers became a skyscraper inferno. people were dying, and we could only watch, thousands of miles away...